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Writing

The Multidimensional Character: How Important is it?

War and Peace by Jayel Aheram

 

The other day I watched the entire series of Bellicher: De Macht van Meneer Miller
(Bellicher: The Power of Mr. Miller). It didn’t take me the whole day – I was
impressed that the entire story was compressed into four short episodes. You
see, the main plot behind Bellicher is an ultimate conspiracy to begin a war between
Christians and Muslims. A secretive group of Christians who pull their resources together are at the center of the conspiracy. In order to attain their goal, they manipulate the news that the European Union top officials receive on their government issued laptops. Of course the news states that Muslims are a threat, and are about to begin a war within Europe. Therefore, Europe, in order to protect itself, must react quickly. The plot is interesting to say the least and the characters are believable. I live in The Hague, so I enjoyed recognizing certain buildings and streets since some scenes of the movie were filmed in The Hague. Overall, I enjoyed watching this series.

There is, however, a nagging factor about the series: The main character, Bellicher, made one mistake after another. I had begun to wonder if people would continue to make the same mistakes in real life if they were in the same situation. For instance, the bad guys kept finding out where Bellicher was. They would show up within seconds. Now, The Hague is small, but I’m not sure that it’s possible to show up within seconds once you’ve figured out where your target is located. But, that’s a minor detail for now. Bellicher constantly used his electronic devices – mobile and computer. Throughout the first and second episodes, he continuously tried logging in to a certain website; a clue that would hopefully lead him to the next, well…clue. All of this even after the bad guys kept finding him, and even beat-up one of Bellicher’s friends. Maybe he had an emotional attachment to his devices? I think it
finally dawned on him in the third or fourth episode – wait a second – it dawned
on another character who was knowledgeable about gadgets that Bellicher’s
mobile and computer should be destroyed. That character was smart! Finally,
someone was using their brain!

Another problem that I had was that Bellicher, before he was forced to destroy it, left his laptop bag, on numerous occasions, in the trunk of his car. He needed the computer to log-in to the website. Wouldn’t you carry the laptop around with you if it was so important, especially if you knew that the bad guys were following you? Oh, and he left a floppy disk containing key clues on his desk at his house. Did I mention that his house had been broken into by the bad guys? The only good thing is that the bad guys weren’t that good with house searches – they missed the key floppy disk all together. At the mention of floppy disk, I should mention that the
series came out in 2010. I have no idea why this key component in the story
dated back to the 80s. Why not give the guy a USB stick or hard drive? But, I
won’t analyze that for too long because I won’t get any answers.

Although these were nagging points for me, I wonder if I am one of the few that would even notice or care about these minute details. If I was watching just for fun, then I wouldn’t have even noticed. But, I have to admit that the errors that Bellicher made are human nature, and help to make him more believable. People, in general, can relate to him. For a writer – that’s the goal. We want to write believable characters; ones that can be related to. Bellicher teaches a valuable lesson – it’s not always a good idea to think logically or even one-tracked when writing.  It’s important to incorporate the hurdles, the mistakes that characters can make because real people have ups and downs in life. And they relate to both when reading a book or watching television!

 

 

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